What You Should and Shouldn’t Do When Meeting With a Philanthropy Donor

A non-profit organization needs to rely on donors if it is to be successful, but meeting with those prospective donors can be daunting. It’s easy for a novice to say or do the wrong thing and lose a potentially valuable donation during this process, so here are just a few things that you should and should not do when meeting with donors.

Do Your Homework

Before you meet with a prospective donor, familiarize yourself with them as much as possible. Most organizations and individuals who are willing to make a large charitable donation most likely have a history that can be studied with a few Google searches, so you have no excuse for not knowing anything about them. Learn what their organization stands for if they have one, what kinds of causes they’ve donated to in the past, and anything else you think might be useful. Be careful about going into too much personal history about an individual though; you don’t want to come across as a stalker or someone who will bring up uncomfortable information during your meeting.

Leave For Your Meeting Early

Never assume that things will go perfectly for you when you leave for any meeting. Getting stuck in traffic because of an accident or bad weather could easily make you late, which is one of the worst things that can happen when you are going to a meeting with a potential donor. Give yourself 15 to 30 minutes of extra time when you leave for your meeting, especially if you’re going someplace that is unfamiliar. Just try not to be too early for your meeting. Having to wait about ten minutes in a lobby is one thing, but if you’re a whole half hour early, either go someplace else to wait so you don’t come off as too eager and desperate.

Know What You Want, But Be Flexible

You should have an idea of what kind of donation you want for your meeting before you go in, and you shouldn’t be afraid to ask for that. On the other hand, you should also be flexible and be willing to compromise. Even if you don’t get the donation you wanted, a smaller donation is better than nothing at all. Don’t just as for any donation, though. Not putting an amount on what you need will just tell your donor that you don’t care enough about your cause and could cause you to walk away with an amount that really isn’t worth your time. In other words, be prepared to negotiate.

How Cryptocurrency and Blockchain are Changing Philanthropy

Most of the headlines surrounding cryptocurrencies tout its revolutionary impact on the monetary system and the vast fortunes being made almost overnight. Famously, the Winkelvoss twins became Bitcoin billionaires. YouTube and social media outlets are crammed full of Bitcoin gurus and promotors showing how average Joe’s became wealthy. From all the hype, it would seem cryptocurrency fosters an avarice that would make Gordon Gecko proud.

Perhaps it does. But a less known aspect of the cryptocurrency revolution is how it is changing philanthropy. As detailed by Cointelegraph, cryptocurrency offers charities options for fundraising, issuing charity coins, and creating crypto-foundations. Some philanthropists are actively using cryptocurrency to increase their charitable efforts.

Many well-known charitable organizations have started accepting Bitcoin donations, at least on a trial basis. Red Cross, Save the Children, United Way, and Electronic Frontier Foundation are amongst the charities accepting Bitcoin. Fidelity Charitable took in $69 million in Bitcoin donations for 2017.

The new crypto charity platform BitHope provides a convenient way for donors to give to their favorite charities. The site advertises that users can utilize their Bitcoins to give hope. Platform users simply navigate to BitHope’s website, where they can search for available charities.

Most initial coin offerings (ICOs) are for business. They are typically used to raise startup capital, much like an initial public offering of stock, though an ICO requires substantially less red tape and remains largely outside the purview of government regulators. Charitable-minded people who believe in a certain cause can now give through charitable coins. For example, Clean Water Coin has been invented to raise money for the charity Water, which works to provide clean water to families in regions suffering scarcity. Pinkcoin offers a unique platform where investors can earn a return and give to charity.

Foundations have long been a mainstay of the charity world. It seems natural that they should extend into the cryptocurrency world, considering that many view cryptocurrency as the future of money. Many charities have already been set up and provide large donations of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies to a large number of charities.

Cryptocurrency shows no sign of slowing down. From ICOs to surging valuations, fortunes are being made. History has shown that when people make tremendous amounts of money, they feel obligated to give back. In the world of cryptocurrency, the charitable giving infrastructure is already being built.