Creating Professional Goals

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When it comes to success, having a strong underlying intrinsic goal will always help cultivate and shape your decisions, your actions, and your thought process each and everyday. But what happens when you have already made significant advances within your career? What goals or objective can you create to help motivate yourself in establishing that consistency that you have worked so hard for all throughout your life? For a few very fortunate people, the answer simply comes to them. But for the rest of us who do not wake up with that goal in place, it takes a little bit of planning in order to clarify and execute for our career goals.

No matter where you are in your career, there should always be a vision and goal within your master plans. As much as we can frivolous live our lives day by day without a care in the world, the reality of it requires these guiding and awe-inspiring ideas to push us to be our best. That is why career goals are important. They are simply the things you want to achieve in your career and the person you are meant to be. While these objectives can be broad, and at times uncertain, they, at the end of the day, provide you with that much-needed direction to the end goals of your career. Think of this like a road map. Rather than wander around aimlessly within your life, your career goals can be your destination for your success.

Now, one thing to point out is the various differences within goals. At one ends we have the broad, ambitious, and overarching goals, which are commonly referred to as conceptual or long-term goals. And on the other end we have the more specific day-by-day task related goals, generally known as operational and short-term objectives. As much as you can have one over the other, it is imperative that you have both. Begin with your long-term goal. This can be something you are looking to accomplish a year (five years, ten years) from now. From that goal alone, you will be able to conceptualize various operational tasks that you will need to accomplish in order for you to reach your long-term goal. For many young professionals, this type of mentality can be beneficial in shaping and molding your career. But what happens if you are already a seasoned veteran within your company? What goals can you establish to motivate yourself each and everyday?

While creating goals as a veteran within your company can oftentimes be challenging, they are, like they were in the beginning of your career, absolutely vital. The worst thing you can do for yourself is to stay stagnate within your job. To prevent this from happening, you need to recreate and articulate a vision statement for your career. The first step is to look back and reflect on all of your success. There is that famous saying: “Sometimes you have to take two-steps back in order to move ten-steps forward.” By having an intrinsic understanding of your career path, you will be able to connect the dots and establish that end goal. Go ask far and question why you made particular jumps and what you want to achieve out of your company.

Now for those who have not reflected, it may seem impractical to start now. Let me tell you, it is never too late to reflect. Reflection, at the end of the day, is the key to learning. This type of thought process will allow you to analyze your experiences and make the necessary changes and modifications to push you to your intended success. For some people, that success is simply getting on the right path. But for others, that long-term goal can require drastic changes and alterations within your life. Whatever is the case, make sure you know what you want. The worst thing you can do to yourself is waste and suffocate your knowledge and talents at a job you distain. Instead, create your goals and most importantly live your dreams.