Is CSR the Solution Your Company Needs?

Every day we work hard at our jobs, and it looks like we’re working harder as time passes on. With downsizing, streamlining staff, and the higher pressure on performance, workers are feeling overworked, tired, and underappreciated. Americans work harder than any developed nation in the world, and it’s been increasingly getting worse; from 1970 to 1990, the time Americans spent at work increased by about one month per year. In 1999, about 20.5% of the workforce (approximately 25 million Americans) reported working a minimum of 49 hours per week, with approximately 11 million of the 25 million said they worked longer than 59 hours each week. Then, in 2014, the Washington Post reported that the average work week had increased from 40 hours to 47 hours for full-time workers.Is CSR the Solution Your Company Needs?

People are spending more time now than ever at work, and are getting little in return as reward. According to the Harvard Business Review, the longer work weeks are making employees less productive and causing them to feel disconnected from their employer and their job.

So how do we rekindle the passion employees feel at the inception of their career? How do we reconnect them to the work they do and help them see the bigger picture of how their work can have a larger impact? One solution is Corporate Social Responsibility.

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a business strategy that looks outside of the business itself and into how the actions of the business can work to deliver better benefits to investors socially, environmentally, and economically. It focuses on a push towards sustainability, whether it’s for health, working conditions, human rights, or others, and looks to effect positive change. While this might appear on the outside as a PR stunt to garner attention, CSR is about promoting positive change from within. If done well and correctly, it can revitalize your employees and give them a sense of purpose in the work that they do.

For a great example of CSR, take a look at Google: through their project Google Green, they’re making strides towards using resources more efficiently and finding alternative (renewable) means of power. And they’re practicing what they preach. The Google Green effort has helped Google see a 50% reduction in power usage for its data centers. The money saved through this initiative can then be reabsorbed into the company to fund other efforts or redistributed to shareholders.

If your employees are feeling overworked at a dead end job, you need to reconsider your approach to employment and operating a business as a whole. If you give your employees something positive to work towards and their efforts a higher purpose, you’ll see employees who are more engaged at work and more productive as well.